Affiliated Faculty

Kate Coyer is Director of the Civil Society and Technology Project for the Center for Media, Data and Society  in the School of Public Policy at CEU. Her research examines the complexities of media practice and policy; digital rights advocacy and the social uses of technologies; media development and communication for social change; the opportunities and challenges of emerging technologies as well as the resilience of ‘old’ mediums like radio.

Marius Dragomir is the director of the Center for Media, Data and Society. He previously worked for the Open Society Foundations (OSF) for over a decade. Since 2007, he has managed the research and policy portfolio of the Program on Independent Journalism (PIJ), formerly the Network Media Program (NMP), in London. He has also been one of the main editors for PIJ's flagship research and advocacy project, Mapping Digital Media, which covered 56 countries worldwide, and he was the main writer and editor of OSF’s Television Across Europe, a comparative study of broadcast policies in 20 European countries.

Sanjay Kumar teaches Academic Writing for Graduate students in the Departments of Gender Studies, Public Policy, , Nationalism Studies and Research and Thesis Writing for Graduate and Doctoral students of Legal Studies. He joined the Centre for Academic Writing in August, 2010. He was awarded PhD in English Language and Literature from Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Delhi in 2010. He has fifteen years of university teaching experience in courses related to English literature, Literature and Culture, Effective Communication, Linguistics, in national technical universities and premier Business schools in India like the National institute of Technology(NIT) and Indian Institute of Management (IIM).

Jessie Labov is a resident fellow in the Center for Media, Data and Society, a member of the Digital Humanities Initiative , and the Project Coordinator of the Text Analysis Across Disciplines Initiative. Before coming to CEU she was Associate Professor in the Department of Slavic and East European Languages and Cultures at Ohio State University. Recent publishing projects include a co-edited volume with Friederike Kind-Kovacs, Samizdat, Tamizdat and Beyond: Transnational Media During and After Socialism (Berghahn 2013), and a monograph entitled Transatlantic Central Europe: Contesting Geography and Redefining Culture Beyond the Nation (forthcoming, CEU Press 2018).

Viktor Lagutov is the head of the Environmental Systems Laboratory at the Department of Environmental Sciences and Policy, Central European University (Budapest, Hungary). He holds a Masters Degree in Applied Mathematics from the South Russia State Technical University (Russia) and MSc and PhD in Environmental Sciences and Policy from the Central European University (Hungary). His research interests are focused on environmental modeling and spatial analysis with special emphasis given to river basins  and water security.

Ulrich Meurer was visiting professor in Visual Theory and Practice at the Department of History in the winter semester of the 2017/18 academic year. His research focus is on film and media philosophy, visual culture and political theory from early modernism to the present, history of the US-American (moving) image in the 19th and 20th centuries, discourses of pré-cinéma and film archeology, Greek film cultures, intermediality (esp. word-image-relations), and digital humanities.

Robyn Dora Radway's research focuses on the production and consumption of culture along and about the frontier between Ottoman and Christian Europe in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, with an emphasis on the Kingdom of Hungary. She works primarily with armor, costume books, maps and a wide range of material culture. Methodologically, she is interested in deconstructing the dichotomy of the Siadian “East” and “West” in order to explore the complexities of the in-between in Europe’s visual, literary, and social relationship with the Ottoman Turks. She's a fellow of CEU's Institute for Advanced Study and she teaches at the Department of History

Marcell Sebők is assistant professor at CEU's Department of Medieval Studies. He studied history, sociology and anthropology at ELTE Budapest and he graduated in 1992.

Marsha Siefert is a communications and cultural historian, with current research projects on nineteenth-century imperial telecommunications networks and cinematic diplomacy in the Cold War. She is also the co-organizer of the initiative, Labor History for the 21st Century in a Global Context.

György E. Szönyi is visiting professor at the Department of Medieval Studies & Department of History at CEU. He is also professor of English and Hungarian Studies at the University of Szeged. He is a cultural and literary historian with special interest in the Renaissance, the role of Western esotericism in early modern and postmodern culture/literature, cultural theory, especially in cultural symbolization and the relationship of words and images, and Hungarian Studies.

Renáta Uitz started teaching at CEU in 2001 and has become chair (director) of the Comparative Constitutional Law program in 2007. She is the founding co-director, with Professor Károly Bárd, of the clinical specialization at the Department of Legal Studies. Her teaching covers subjects in comparative constitutional law and human rights with special emphasis on the enforcement of constitutional rights. Theories and practices of good government, transition to and from constitutional democracy, questions of personal autonomy and equality, including religious liberty and sexual autonomy, are at the center of her research interests.

Hyaesin Yoon is assistant professor at CEU's Department of Gender Studies. Her areas of interest include transnational biopolitics, postcolonial criticisms, critical animal studies/posthumanisms, feminist science and technology studies, medical humanities, as well as performance and literary theories. Her present focus is on how technological assemblages of humans and other animals mediate the power relations of sex/gender, race, disability, and species in a transnational context. She is currently working on her book project Prosthetic Memories, examining the ethics of embodied memory in an age of transnational mobility and biotechnology by examining the diasporic tongue (as both language and organ), animal cloning, and human stem cell research across the United States and South Korea.